Analyze each individual case study separately and use headings for each of the articles

Week One Case Studies

Answer the questions in “A Case Study in Change: Hayward, California,” from Police Supervision and Management in an Era of Community Policing (p. 21). Then, choose one of the case studies in Chapter Two (pp. 43-45) and one from Chapter Three (pp. 76-78). Answer the “Questions for Discussion” of the case studies you have chosen. The answers to your discussion questions will help you write your Case Study Analysis.

Writing the Case Study Analysis:

  1. Must be at least four double-spaced pages in length (exclusive of title and reference pages), and formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
  2. Must include a title page with the following:
    1. Title of paper
    2. Student’s name
    3. Course name and number
    4. Instructor’s name
    5. Date submitted
  3. Must begin with an introductory paragraph that has a succinct thesis statement.
  4. Must address the case study question with critical thought.
    1. Individual Case Study Review: Analyze each individual case study separately and use headings for each of the articles
    2. Analysis Paragraph: Provide an analysis paragraph following the individual review of each of the case studies that addresses the concepts highlighted in your chosen case studies. (Be sure to relate your analysis to the case study discussion question.)
  5. Must end with a conclusion that reaffirms your thesis.
  6. Must use at least two scholarly resources (at least one of which can be found in the Ashford University Library).
  7. Must document all sources in APA style, as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
  8. Must include a separate reference page, formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.

Carefully review the Grading Rubric (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. for the criteria that will be used to evaluate your assignment.

Chapter 2 case studies

CASE STUDIES

Following are two case studies that enable the reader to consider some of the substantive issues described in the chapter and to consider some options as solutions to problems.

Case Study #1 Adapting to the Role: The Laissez-Faire Supervisor

Sgt. Tom Gresham is newly promoted and assigned to patrol on the graveyard shift; he knows each officer on his shift, and several are close friends. Sgt. Gresham was an excellent patrol officer and prided himself on his reputation and ability to get along with his peers. He also believed this trait would benefit him as a supervisor. From the beginning, Sgt. Gresham believed that he could get more productivity from his officers by relating to them at their level. He made an effort to socialize after work and took pride in giving his team the liberty of referring to him by his first name. Sgt. Gresham also believed that it was a supervisor’s job to not get in the way of “good” police work. In his view, his team responded tremendously, generating the highest number of arrest and citation statistics in the entire department.

Unfortunately, his shift was also generating the highest number of citizen complaints—yet, few complaints were sustained by internal affairs. It was Gresham’s opinion that complaints are the product of good, aggressive police work. He had quickly developed the reputation among subordinates as being “a cop’s cop.” One Monday morning, Sgt. Gresham is surprised when he is called in to his patrol captain’s office; the internal affairs lieutenant is also present. They show Gresham a number of use-of-force complaints against his team over the past week while Sgt. Gresham was on vacation. Despite his captain’s efforts to describe the gravity of the situation, Gresham failed to grasp the seriousness of the complaints, and how his supervisory style may have contributed to them.

Questions for Discussion:

· 1.What do you think are some of Sgt. Gresham’s problems as a new supervisor?

· 2.As his captain, what kind of advice would you give to Gresham?

· 3.What corrective action must Sgt. Gresham take immediately with his team of officers?

Case Study #2 No One Said It Would Be Easy….

Officer John Knox is 25 years old, married, and has two young children. He is a graduate of the local university, and was one of the top academy graduates. He is bilingual, serves as an interpreter as needed, and enjoys the respect of neighborhood leaders. Officer Knox received outstanding performance ratings during his first three years of service, but his last rating was only satisfactory. This is his second year of graduate school at the university, and his total energies have been devoted to the completion of his master’s degree. Since beginning his master’s work a year ago, his work performance has deteriorated to the point of becoming marginal: his responses to calls for service have been less than stellar, as have his enforcement of traffic laws, community problem solving efforts, and other endeavors. Furthermore, you, as his newly promoted supervisor, are aware that Knox has been parking his vehicle and studying, rather than solving problems on his beat. Two weeks ago, his wife phoned you saying that she and Knox are having serious domestic issues; she added that she is certain he has met another woman at the university, and that his conduct is rapidly becoming a subject of neighborhood gossip. Today a news reporter phones your receptionist and states that a report was received about an hour ago on the police radio scanner that Officer Knox had been discovered in his car at the bottom of a ravine in a secluded part of the county, and upon arriving there the reporter witnessed Knox in the car with a well-known woman who is a dean at the university. The reporter wants to interview you and is on hold. You know that the agency’s PIO is on vacation.

Questions for Discussion:

1.

What do you have the receptionist tell the reporter? Do you talk to him or not? If so, what do you say?

2.

What steps do you take after dealing with the reporter?

3.

What are the key issues presented in this situation?

4.

How do you deal with these key issues?

Case Study #3 Seeing the Big Picture

Sgt. Henry Garcia, a college-educated 18-year veteran, scored near the top in his promotional exam. His career has essentially involved time spent in the planning/research and the training divisions. He also teaches report writing at the area academy. Garcia believes very strongly that officers are only as good as the reports they write. He believes his officers should write exceptional reports, and he devotes most of his time to reviewing officers’ reports, counseling them on report content, and recommending changes and revisions. His demands require officers to spend inordinate amounts of time with their report-related duties (accruing much overtime in the process). Garcia often uses his team’s reports at the recruit academy as examples of “good” police work. Arrests in his division are the lowest in the agency, but the division has the highest number of reported offenses. Sgt. Garcia often asks his officers why the arrest and crime statistics are so poor, but they fail to respond to him. Frustrated, he schedules an appointment to see his superior, a lieutenant, to discuss the problems.

Questions for Discussion:

1.

As the lieutenant, what would you tell Sgt. Garcia are the reasons for the crime problem in his district and his relations with his team?

2.

What might you suggest to rectify this situation?

(Peak 43-45)

Peak, Kenneth J., Larry K. Gaines and Ronald Glensor. Police Supervision and Management for Ashford University, 3rd Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions. VitalBook file.

The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

Chapter 3 case study

material.

Case Study #1 The New Kid on the (Lieutenant’s) Block

You are a newly promoted lieutenant and have decided that a priority is to schedule an open meeting with your sergeants to discuss your priorities and any problems, and then for you to respond to any questions. At the meeting’s conclusion, a sergeant raises her hand and says the sergeants are quite concerned about what they might expect in terms of your management style, particularly as it concerns personnel discipline, rewards, and motivation. She further asks you to explain why you believe this style to be the best for you.

Question for Discussion

1.

Based on the readings in this chapter, which management style would you say is probably your own? Explain why you feel this one is best and suits your personality.

Case Study #2 The “Rising Star” Who Falls Too Far

Detective Thurmond Thomas is a “rising star” in the Bentley County Sheriff’s Department, and at age 25 is the youngest officer there ever to be promoted to rank of detective. Recently married, Thomas is excited about his new assignment and is looking forward to the day-shift hours and weekends off. Thomas begins his new assignment with great desire, often volunteering for the less popular cases and working a lot of overtime. He is doing everything possible to make a good impression on his more experienced peers. Sgt. Wise takes a particular liking to Thomas and is making every effort to recognize his good work among the other detectives. He even suggests that Thomas consider being promoted at the soonest possible time and offers to coach him for the promotional exam. Everything appears to be going well for young Thomas. After a couple of months, however, Sgt. Wise begins to notice that Thomas is using a lot of sick time and has lost much of his enthusiasm for the job. Wise meets with Thomas to discuss the matter. Thomas explains that he is now uncomfortable in the detective division and does not fit in with the rest of the detectives. He adds that the others simply ignore him, never inviting him to lunch or coffee. Sgt. Wise decides that Thomas is simply lacking self-confidence due to his young age. He then discusses Thomas’s concerns and his potential with the other detectives, in hopes of improving relations. Instead, matters only worsen, and now the lieutenant is directing Wise to investigate Thomas’s sick days to determine if he is abusing his leave time.

Questions for Discussion

1.

What is your assessment of this situation?

2.

Does Sgt. Wise correctly understand the nature of the problem?

3.

How would you describe Thomas’s problem, using the motivation theories discussed in the chapter?

4.

What could Sgt. Wise have done differently?

Case Study #3 Where to Begin When a Veteran Comes In

Officer Maria Sanchez has 17 years of experience, mostly as a detective in undercover narcotics and vice. She is a capable officer with numerous departmental commendations and awards for her work. As a result, Sanchez was selected to be a member of an elite multi-agency vice and narcotics task force. On the first day of her new assignment, Sanchez met with her new supervisor, Sgt. Webster. He is from a neighboring agency and does not know Sanchez outside the selection interview process and review of her personnel file. Sgt. Webster was also recently assigned to the unit from patrol division where he gained the reputation of being somewhat of a perfectionist and detail person. Webster assumed responsibility for breaking in all new team members to ensure they knew exactly what, when, where, and how they should perform their tasks. Webster had developed a four-week orientation for all new members. After two weeks of basic orientation, including an elementary review of drug law, raid procedures, vice laws, and so on, Sanchez becomes extremely frustrated with Sgt. Webster and asks why she is not being allowed to participate in drug and vice raids with the rest of her team. She argues that she has worked with the task force on many occasions, is very familiar with operational procedures, and could demonstrate her abilities if Webster would only allow her to work with the rest of the team. Webster denies her request, saying she has to finish the orientation just the same as everyone else does. The next day, Sanchez submits a memo to the lieutenant in charge of the task force, requesting to be reassigned back to her agency. In the memo, Sanchez states that she believes Sgt. Webster is treating her differently from other people in the unit and does not have any respect for her past experience and work. She does not believe she can work under these conditions, in which she is “being treated like a child.”

Questions for Discussion

1.

Could this problem have been avoided? If so, how?

2.

What situational style of leadership was Sgt. Webster employing?

3.

How would you assess the maturity level of Officer Sanchez?

4.

What style of situational leadership would be more appropriate for this situation?

(Peak 76-78)

Peak, Kenneth J., Larry K. Gaines and Ronald Glensor. Police Supervision and Management for Ashford University, 3rd Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions. VitalBook file.

The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

Chapter 4 case studies

Case Study #1 Problems Plague the Park

Paxton Park holds tremendous significance for the predominately older African American and Hispanic residents of the city’s Hillsborough District. Referred to as “instant park,” it was literally constructed within a day by residents during the late 1960s. Since then, it has deteriorated and become a haven for drug dealers and gang members. Today, few residents dare use the park. Residents frequently report to the police all manner of suspicious activities in the park, including sightings of persons under the influence harassing children and houses bordering the park that are being used as crash pads for drug users. In most instances, the police response is to send a police unit by the park to disperse the drug dealers. Few arrests are ever made. On occasion, the countywide consolidated narcotics unit and the department’s special weapons and tactics unit initiate a program to make massive arrests. This approach usually involves a large number of arrests, but it also generates complaints of excessive force and racism by offenders and residents alike. The department has also initiated a narcotics tip line for residents, but few calls have been made since it was installed six months ago. Sgt. Brewer was recently assigned to the Hillsborough District. She has recently attended a COPPS training seminar and believes that the drug and other problems at the park could be handled in a different manner than in the past. She calls a team meeting to discuss how they might approach the problem.

Questions for Discussion

1.

How would you use the problem analysis triangle to thoroughly identify the problem?

2.

What responses might be considered by the team (be sure to include all organizations that could help)?

3.

How could Sgt. Brewer evaluate their successes?

4.

How might a commander under the CompStat model approach this problem with the precinct’s managers and supervisors? What kinds of information would be requested?

Case Study #2 The Horrendous Highway Hangout

The Burger Barn is the most popular fast-food restaurant in town and it is open 24 hours a day. It is located in the middle sector of town where two highways intersect; this is a busy four-lane commercial area that is adjacent to a low-income residential area consisting of mobile homes, apartment complexes, and small single-family homes. Sgt. Maas has noticed a tremendous increase in calls for service at the location and on checking computer-aided dispatch records, discovers that CFS to the Burger Barn had indeed increased to nearly 90 per month. Further analysis reveals that the majority of CFS occur during the late night/early morning hours, peaking between 1:00 A.M. and 3:00 A.M. The CFS mostly involve large crowds of juveniles, fights, noise disturbances, shots fired, and traffic congestion and accidents. A few police officers have even been injured while attempting to break up fights. The restaurant’s manager has attempted to limit access to the building during the peak hours, allowing only five juveniles inside at any one time. This approach has resulted in long lines forming outside and has increased the number of disturbances and fights. Employees are frequently harassed by angry customers waiting for service in the building. Many of the juveniles are cruising and driving carelessly, paying little attention to the traffic signals and contributing significantly to congestion, which is creating a backup on the adjoining highway, generating a letter of complaint from the state highway patrol to the police chief.

Questions for Discussion

1.

How would you thoroughly analyze the problem using the problem analysis triangle?

2.

What responses may be considered (be sure to include all organizations that could help)?

3.

How could Sgt. Maas evaluate their successes?

(Peak 101-103)

Peak, Kenneth J., Larry K. Gaines and Ronald Glensor. Police Supervision and Management for Ashford University, 3rd Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions. VitalBook file.

The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

Chapter 5 case studies

Case Study #1 The Lieutenants’ Latency

In recent months it has become increasingly apparent to your deputy chief of operations that the watch commanders (lieutenants) and, by extension, sergeants, are not communicating, coordinating, or cooperating well toward meeting the organization’s mission and goals. Specifically, three central issues are at the core of the matter:

· 1.Several patrol lieutenants have recently been attempting to improve the quality of officers’ reports by rejecting those that are deemed unacceptable. Other lieutenants have taken the view that, with all of the other pressures on officers to perform, this concern about reports is far too “nitpicky.”

· 2.Six months ago all patrol vehicles in the department were equipped with mobile data computers (MDCs) to improve officer efficiency in the field and to relieve the burden on the Communications section. Now, however, it is clear that differences of opinion exist about when it is practical and appropriate to use the MDCs; the deputy chief has learned that officers are in fact using them infrequently in the field, and practically never during traffic stops. This has naturally resulted in a heavy burden being placed again on Communications. Some lieutenants have differences of opinion about when/how MDCs should be used.

· 3.Due to the above two issues, both sergeants and patrol officers, perceiving the differences in how lieutenants view the matters, have been “shopping” for lieutenants who are more “sensitive” to their side, and have them approve their reports.

These are just three examples of several where watch commanders are not communicating or working well together. This is the overarching problem, resulting in increased animosity between lieutenants and decreasing consistency between shifts. Clearly, the need exists for greater strength and consensus among mid-level managers. In sum, each lieutenant is either part of the problem, or a part of the solution.

Questions for Discussion

1.

Using the information provided, follow the steps below to evaluate the problem and make suggestions for ways to resolve the problem. You are encouraged to think outside the box and include all levels of command in your assessment and suggestions.

· A.Evaluate the overall problem. Be specific and concise as to what are the causal factors.

· B.Write an impact statement. Tell how these specific problems if left unchecked can have wide-ranging negative consequences throughout the agency.

· C.Recommend change. Be explicit as to what you feel must be done to rectify the problems, especially as they relate to interaction between management, supervisory, and rank-and-file personnel.

Case Study #2 The Case of “Superman” on Patrol

Officer “Spike” Jones recently transferred back to patrol division after three years in a street crimes unit, where he was involved with numerous high-risk arrests of dangerous offenders. He has built a reputation within the department as being a highly skilled tactical officer, he is team leader of the agency’s special operations (SWAT) team, and he is also a trainer in special operations and tactics at the regional police academy. For these reasons, Jones’s supervisor was pleased to have him assigned to the team, to impart his knowledge and experiences to the other officers. Indeed, when Jones first comes to the team, the supervisor praises his accomplishments in front of the other officers. Within a month, however, the supervisor begins to notice a wide rift developing between Jones and the rest of the team. Jones is overheard on several occasions discussing the menial work of patrol, saying it’s not “real” police work. He is always trying to impress other officers with his experiences; he also says he cannot wait to get out of patrol and into another specialized, high-risk assignment. The team members complain to the supervisor that Jones does not fit in. After two months, this rift has grown much wider, and the supervisor is noticing that the other officers have begun to be slow in backing up Jones at calls. Upon questioning some of the team members, they tell the supervisor that “Superman Jones doesn’t need our help anyway.”

Questions for Discussion

1.

As the supervisor concerned, how would you mediate the conflict that is developing within your team?

2.

What kinds of strategies can the supervisor employ to reduce or eliminate the rift that has developed within the team?

3.

What does the supervisor need to do with the other team members? What kinds of compromises or adjustments do the team members need to make in order to include Jones as part of their team?

4.

What does the supervisor need to do with Jones? What kinds of compromises or adjustments does Jones need to make in order to become a team member?

(Peak 126-127)

Peak, Kenneth J., Larry K. Gaines and Ronald Glensor. Police Supervision and Management for Ashford University, 3rd Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions. VitalBook file.

The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

Chapter 6 case study

Case Study #1 In the Hot Seat: Developing a New Training Model

You are the shift commander, a lieutenant, on the evening shift of a medium-sized city police department. Your captain has become increasingly disheartened with the old field training officer (FTO) training program, as she does not believe that it best suits the needs for today’s community policing era. You are initially charged with developing an outline for a new program that incorporates problem solving, using what you know about community policing and problem solving as well as existing training methods.

Questions for Discussion

1.

What would be some of the topics you would want to cover in this program?

2.

How would you measure whether or not officers were learning how to solve problems?

3.

How would you build in some hands-on learning experiences for the class members? What kinds of community problems would you include?

Case Study #2 An FTO “Drives” Her Points Home

Six months have passed since the Arturo Hills Police Department lost its first officer to a traffic accident. A probationary officer was killed when his vehicle collided at an intersection with a passenger vehicle, also killing the female driver and her two young children. An investigation of the accident determined that the officer was responding to a business alarm and ran through a stop sign at 50 miles per hour. It was determined that the circumstances did not warrant the speed involved and concluded that the accident was avoidable. A lawsuit quickly ensues, and lawyers representing the family of the woman and her two children begin by reviewing the department’s training files. They learn that 54 percent of the agency’s accidents involved probationary officers, and that 90 percent of those employees were trained by the same field training officer (FTO): Nancy Banks. Banks is a veteran officer with 12 years of patrol experience; she is the depart-ment’s pursuit driving instructor. She tells probationary officers assigned to her shift that she loves working nights because of its freedom from the administrative “brass hats” and the boring school and shoplifting calls that are so common on day shift. For Banks and her officers, stop signs and stop lights do not exist on the graveyard shift, because “only ‘cops and crooks’ are out.” Banks is hard on the recruits, uses FTO information to terminate a greater proportion of new officers than her peers, and pushes their driving skills to the limit during in-progress calls. A few recruits have complained to the shift commander about the dangers involved with the driving style that she teaches and requires, but their concerns are ignored.

Questions for Discussion

1.

What lessons can be learned from this case?

2.

Could the department have done anything differently in the administration of its FTO program to keep this situation from developing?

3.

Should a supervisor have known about the potential problems and intervened? How?

Case Study #3 The “Too Cool for School” Supervisor, or How to Conduct Training in Absentia

Sergeant Arnold Kazinsky has been with the state police for nearly 30 years. His reputation for being a no-nonsense, hard-nosed veteran is legendary, as are stories about the record number of citations he has written over the years. Kazinsky often yearns for a return to the days when troopers were hired and given a map, a citation book, and the keys to a cruiser and assigned to work by their sergeant. Kazinsky does not agree with the new, contemporary emphasis on trooper training and believes that the troopers’ time can be better spent on the road instead of in the classroom. When state headquarters issues a series of officer safety videos to be shown at briefings, in typical fashion Kazinsky does not take the training seriously. He plays the videotapes during briefings as told but turns down the volume so low that it is almost impossible to hear them; furthermore, he does not distribute the accompanying handout materials for discussion and even leaves the room while the training video is playing, allowing the troopers freedom to banter among themselves at will. Meanwhile, Trooper Benjamin Scott, who has just completed the nine-month basic training academy, is assigned to work for Sgt. Kazinsky. Scott idolizes the legendary Kazinsky and wants to do his best to please his first supervisor. At briefing, even with the training video sound turned low, Scott strains to watch and hear the video intently, in hopes of picking up some new methods for doing his job better. That evening, Scott is dispatched to a suspicious person call at a highway truck stop. Scott uses a frisk technique he saw earlier that day on the briefing video, patting the suspect down with one hand while holding his shotgun in the other. The shotgun accidentally discharges, killing the suspect. Internal Affairs later discovers that the video was actually a demonstration on how not to frisk a suspect; the discussion during the video and handout materials made that fact clear, and a training staff member was supposed to be present to emphasize the point. Without any training or supervisory personnel making this clear to all who saw the video, the viewers did not get this major point.

Questions for Discussion

1.

Did Kazinsky err? If so, how? Is he civilly liable?

2.

Do you feel Trooper Scott is blameworthy?

3.

This chapter discussed different types of training. How can training create liability for supervisors?

4.

How can training that is national in scope be in conflict with local ordinances or policies? What should an agency do to ensure that the wrong training information is not distributed to officers?

(Peak 158-160)

Peak, Kenneth J., Larry K. Gaines and Ronald Glensor. Police Supervision and Management for Ashford University, 3rd Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions. VitalBook file.

The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

 

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