Analyze each individual case study separately and use headings for each of the articles

Week 3 – Assignment

Week Three Case Studies

Choose three case studies from the following chapters; Chapter Seven (pp. 190-191), Chapter Eight (pp. 210-211), Chapter Nine (pp. 238-240), and Chapter Ten (pp. 266-267). No two case studies can come from the same chapter. Answer the “Questions for Discussion” of the case studies you have chosen. The answers to your discussion questions will help you write your Case Study Analysis.

Writing the Case Study Analysis:

  1. Must be at least four double-spaced pages in length (exclusive of title and reference pages), and formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
  2. Must include a title page with the following:
    1. Title of paper
    2. Student’s name
    3. Course name and number
    4. Instructor’s name
    5. Date submitted
  3. Must begin with an introductory paragraph that has a succinct thesis statement.
  4. Must address the case study question with critical thought.
    1. Individual Case Study Review: Analyze each individual case study separately and use headings for each of the articles
    2. Analysis Paragraph: Provide an analysis paragraph following the individual review of each of the case studies that addresses the concepts highlighted in your chosen case studies. (Be sure to relate your analysis to the case study discussion question.)
  5. Must end with a conclusion that reaffirms your thesis.
  6. Must use at least two scholarly resources (at least one of which can be found in the Ashford Online Library).
  7. Must document all sources in APA style, as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
  8. Must include a separate reference page, formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.Chapter 7

    CASE STUDIES

    Following are two case studies that enable the reader to consider some of the substantive issues involved with appraising officer performance and to consider some possible solutions.

    Case Study #1 Knowing Your People, or Searching for Hidden Meanings

    You are a supervisor in Bay City, recently transferred from the robbery/homicide section of detectives to day shift patrol. You begin your new assignment by reviewing crime reports and calls for service data for the area and meeting with each of your officers to discuss their view of the area’s problems and their work productivity. The south area of the district is divided geographically into five beats, consisting of single-family homes, small commercial businesses, and several large apartment complexes. Approximately 50,000 citizens live in the area; most are middle-class white and Hispanic people who reside and work in the area. Crime analysis data reveals that the most prevalent crime problems are daytime burglaries and thefts of property from the apartment complexes, juvenile drinking, and vandalism. The vandalism is not gang related and is mostly spray paint tagging of schools and businesses. There are three main thoroughfares through the area, but traffic accidents are low in comparison with the rest of the city. After reviewing three of your officers’ past performance evaluations, you determine that Officer Stengel leads the patrol division in felony arrests. Her follow-up investigations have led to the identification of two groups of daytime burglars who were truants from the local school. A review of other performance areas shows similar good effort. Officer Robbins has just completed his probationary period. Troubled by the vandalism, he began working with the city attorney and local business owners on an ordinance that would ban the sale of spray paint to juveniles. Robbins makes every effort to work on this project between calls for service, but some of his fellow officers have complained about having to handle some of his calls. Officer Franklin has 10 years’ experience and would like to work a motorcycle traffic assignment. Selections will be made in six months. In an effort to demonstrate his interest in that assignment, Franklin currently leads the department in the number of citations written. He also leads the department in citizen complaints of rude behavior, but only 2 of 10 complaints in the past three months were sustained. Assume that you are about to engage in an annual performance appraisal for each officer.

    Questions for Discussion

    1.

    What are your observations of each officer’s performance?

    2.

    Do you have any concerns about any of the behaviors demonstrated by any of the officers?

    3.

    Do the officers satisfactorily address the district’s problems?

    4.

    Are there any other issues that may require your attention? If so, how would you handle those issues?

    5.

    Which performance appraisal system (among those described in this chapter) would you opt to use?

    Case Study #2 Seeing the World (and Subordinates) Through Rose-Colored Glasses

    Sgt. Wilcox is a 10-year veteran, having worked mostly in the fraud section of detectives. She is recently assigned to day shift patrol division and assumes responsibilities for a team of mostly experienced and capable officers. Wilcox believes in a participative management style and therefore thinks that her officers should be involved in setting their work goals and objectives and should participate in the performance evaluation process. Wilcox meets with her team and outlines her approach to performance evaluations. Believing that this should be a positive experience for all, she instructs her officers to keep an individual log of their more notable achievements during the performance period. At the end of the rating period, Wilcox uses their top five accomplishments as a basis for their annual evaluation. When the first rating period is completed, Wilcox is pleased to find that her officers received some of the highest performance ratings in the department. However, she recently learns from her lieutenant that other supervisors are voicing criticisms of her evaluation methods. She is now confused about her evaluation method.

    Questions for Discussion

    1.

    What, if any, do you perceive to be the good aspects of Wilcox’s personal method of evaluation?

    2.

    What problems might arise from Sgt. Wilcox’s rating system?

    3.

    What rater errors are being committed, if any? What might be the basis for the peer supervisors’ criticisms?

    (Peak 190-191)

    Peak, Kenneth J., Larry K. Gaines and Ronald Glensor. Police Supervision and Management for Ashford University, 3rd Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions. VitalBook file.

    The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

    Chapter 8

    CASE STUDIES

    The following two case studies provide the reader with some insights concerning how quickly stress can be generated and its effect on police officers; also included are some of the difficult decisions that supervisors, managers, and administrators have to make regarding stressful situations involving their subordinates.

    Case Study #1 Near Shootout at K-9 Corral

    The headlines read “Near Shootout at K-9 Corral.” The department is stunned by the events of Sunday evening. During a weekly training session, K-9 Officer Tom Watson pointed his duty weapon at Officer Jack Connolly and threatened to shoot him during an argument. Fortunately, no one was injured, but Watson is under investigation for assault. Officer Watson’s friends are not surprised. Since joining the K-9 Unit three months ago, he has been the subject of intense teasing, especially by Connolly, who liked to imitate Watson’s stuttered speech. Watson is very sensitive about his speech and attended three years of therapy at the local university before gaining enough confidence to take the police officer test. Lately, Connolly’s teasing has become more personal—he has imitated Watson’s stutter over the police radio. When other officers and dispatchers began to join in, Watson asked Sgt. Aldous to speak with Connolly. Aldous explained that all new guys got teased and warned him not to make the situation worse by complaining. For the next two weeks, Watson called in sick on the six days that he and Connolly would have worked together. Just prior to the incident, Watson’s fiancé had broken up with him (telling Watson she had a new love interest), he had learned that he owed a significant amount of money in back taxes to the government, and he was bitten on the hand by another K-9 handler’s dog during practice exercises. When Connolly initiated his teasing on the day in question, Watson burst into a rage of vulgarities and threats, drew his service revolver, and pointed it at Connolly; other officers tackled and disarmed Watson.

    Questions for Discussion

    1.

    What were some of the issues and precipitating factors leading to this incident?

    2.

    Were there any warning signs? If so, what were they?

    3.

    Could this incident have been avoided? If so, how?

    4.

    What were Sgt. Aldous’s responsibilities in this matter? Did he meet those responsibilities?

    Case Study #2 An Agency at the End of Its ROP

    Hill City is a relatively small community of about 80,000 people, whose police department has developed an aggressive Repeat Offender Program (ROP). Its eight hand-picked and specially trained officers engage in forced entries into apartments and houses, serving search warrants on the “worst of the worst” wanted felons. Their work is dangerous and physical, thus all of ROP’s officers are in top physical condition. The supervisor overseeing the ROP team, Sgt. Lyle, was a drill instructor in the military prior to joining the force. He has developed an impressive training regimen for the ROP officers. They usually work out on their own time at least once a week, have high esprit de corps, and pride themselves on never losing a suspect or a physical confrontation. They often go out partying together to “blow off steam.” They generally consider themselves to be elite and “head and shoulders above the rest.” One day, while the team was attempting to serve a robbery warrant at a local motel, the suspect escaped through a rear window and led three ROP officers on a foot pursuit. After running extremely hard for about six blocks, the officers became exhausted and were unable to maintain their chase.

    The following week, the same suspect robbed a fast-food establishment, and during his escape he killed a clerk and seriously wounded a police officer. Irate because the ROP team failed to catch the suspect earlier, many Hill City patrol officers begin to criticize the ROP team—whose members they consider to be overly exalted prima donnas—with one officer stating to a newspaper reporter that the entire team should be disciplined and that ROP should be disbanded. In one instance, a fight nearly ensued between two officers. The situation has now reached a boiling point, causing nearly all officers to take one side or another, fomenting a lot of stress and turmoil within the small agency, and causing officer requests for sick leave and vacation time to spike as never before. Sensing the urgency of the situation, and that his agency is being torn apart both from within and without, the chief asks all administrators (two deputy chiefs) and middle managers (four lieutenants) for input to deal with the public and the press, reduce the internal strife, and determine if any procedural or training issues require the department’s attention. He further asks his six supervisors to provide input concerning means of reducing or ending the high level of hostility among patrol officers.

    Questions for Discussion

    1.

    Should Sgt. Lyle shoulder any responsibility for the suspect situation and its aftermath (dissension within the department)? What kinds of inquiries might you make to determine whether or not this is the case?

    2.

    Given that this seems to have become an agency-wide stress problem, what might the deputy chiefs, lieutenants, and sergeants recommend to the chief?

    3.

    Should the ROP team be disbanded or continued under different supervision, training, and methods of operation

    (Peak 210-211)

    Peak, Kenneth J., Larry K. Gaines and Ronald Glensor. Police Supervision and Management for Ashford University, 3rd Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions. VitalBook file.

    The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

    Chapter 9

    CASE STUDIES

    The following three case studies demonstrate some of the ethical dilemmas in which supervisors and managers may find themselves.

    Case Study #1 Company’s Comin’

    You and your partner, a senior deputy, are dispatched on a “found property” call. When you contact the reporting persons, they tell you they have found what appears to be stolen property in the field behind their fence. You find the following: a high-powered microscope, an HD television set, and a DVD player; obviously the burglar got scared away and left the items in the field. You inventory the property and give a receipt to the reporting party, who states they wish to claim the property if, after 30 days, the rightful owner is not found. When you return to the patrol car, your partner tells you he is expecting a “hoard” of people at his home this weekend for the Super Bowl, and that he could really use the television set to “take the load off” their living room. He adds that he is going to “borrow” it for a few days, take it home for the Super Bowl, and then return it on Monday to the property room.

    Questions for Discussion

    1.

    How would you handle this situation? Would you discuss this matter with anyone? If so, with whom?

    2.

    Is there any way(s) in which this situation can be made worse? How?

    Case Study #2 Redneck Causes Escalation to Black and Blue

    Officer Burns is known to have extreme difficulty in relating to persons of color and others who are socially different from himself. Burns admits to his sergeant that he grew up in a prejudiced home environment and that he has little sympathy or understanding for people “who cause all the damn trouble.” The officer never received any sensitivity or diversity training at the academy or within the department. The supervisor fails to understand the weight of the problem and has very little patience with Burns. So, believing it will correct the matter, the supervisor decides to assign Burns to a minority section of town so he will improve his ability to relate to diverse groups. Within a week, Burns responds to a disturbance at a housing project where residents are partying noisily and a fight is in progress. Burns immediately becomes upset, yelling at the residents to quiet down; they fail to respond, so Burns draws his baton and begins poking residents and ordering them to comply with his directions. The crowd immediately turns against Burns, who then has to call for backup assistance. After the other officers arrive, a fight ensues between residents and officers, and several officers and residents are injured and numerous arrests are made. The following day the neighborhood council meets with the mayor, demanding that Burns be fired and threatening a lawsuit.

    Questions for Discussion

    1.

    Is there any liability or negligence present in this situation? If so, what kind?

    2.

    Could the supervisor have dealt with Burns’s lack of sensitivity in a better manner? If so, how?

    Case Study #3 Getting the Job Done

    Gothamville is a Midwestern city with a high crime rate and poor relations between the police and the public. The new reform mayor and police chief campaigned on a platform of cleaning up crime in the streets and ineffectiveness of government. They launched a commission to investigate what was termed a “litany of problems” within the police department. The investigation found that officers routinely lied about the probable cause for their arrests and searches, falsified search warrant applications, and basically violated rules of collecting and preserving evidence. They were also known to protect each other under a “shroud of secrecy” and to commit perjury in front of grand juries and at trials. These problems were found to be systemic throughout the agency; however, greed and corruption were not the motivating factors behind officers’ giving perjured testimony. Officers believed that their false testimony and other such activities were the only means by which they could put persons they believed guilty behind bars. Worse yet, the study also found that prosecutors routinely tolerated or at least tacitly approved of such conduct. The study also found that many police officers did not consider giving false testimony to be a form of corruption, which they believed implies personal profit. Instead, they viewed testifying as just another way to “get the job done.”

    Questions for Discussion

    1.

    Do you believe that the officers’ means of lying about the basis for their arrests and searches justified the end result of making arrests?

    2.

    What about the prosecutors’ tolerance of the officers’ unethical behavior? To what ethical standards should the prosecutor’s office be held?

    3.

    As a supervisor, when these kinds of behaviors come to light, what punishment, if any, do you think is warranted for the persons involved?

    4.

    What actions, if any, could a supervisor take to oversee officers’ activities to prevent and detect such behaviors?

    (Peak 238-240)

    Peak, Kenneth J., Larry K. Gaines and Ronald Glensor. Police Supervision and Management for Ashford University, 3rd Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions. VitalBook file.

    The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

    Chapter 10

    CASE STUDIES

    Following are two case studies, challenging the reader to look at disciplinary issues and determine what, if any, supervisory style changes or punitive measures are appropriate for the circumstances.

    Case Study #1 Making Enemies Fast: The “Misunderstood” Disciplinarian

    Sgt. Jerold Jones does not understand why his officers appeal all of his disciplinary recommendations. He takes matters of discipline seriously; it commonly takes him three to four weeks to investigate minor matters—three to four times longer than other supervisors. Jones believes that by doing so, he shows great concern for his officers and, in fact, does not even question the officers about their behavior until the investigation is nearly complete and he has interviewed everyone involved in the matter. Jones decides to speak to his officers about the matter. He is surprised when they tell him that they do not trust him. Indeed, they fail to understand why so much time is needed for him to investigate the minor incidents. They believe that he is being secretive and is always looking for ways to find fault with their performance. Jones argues that his recommendations are consistent with those of other sergeants and provides some examples of similar cases that were handled by various supervisors. Apparently unconvinced by Jones’s argument, the next day an officer appeals one of Jones’s disciplinary recommendations concerning a minor traffic accident.

    Questions for Discussion

    1.

    Are the officers’ allegations of Sgt. Jones’s unfairness valid?

    2.

    What requisites of sound disciplinary policy may Jones not understand that may be leading to the officers’ appeals?

    3.

    Under the circumstances, should Jones simply ignore the officers’ complaints? Are their perceptions that important?

    Case Study #2 Downtown Sonny Brown

    Officer Sonny Brown works the transport wagon downtown and has worked this assignment on day shift for several years. Because of his length of service in this assignment, he has earned the nickname “Downtown” Brown. He loves “hooking and booking” drunks and takes great pride in keeping the streets safe and clean. Local business owners appreciate his efforts, even once honoring him as the Chamber of Commerce “Officer of the Year.” Sgt. Carol Jackson is recently promoted and receives her first patrol assignment to the downtown district. As it has been a while since she worked patrol, she decides to ride with Brown for a couple of days to learn about the district and its problems. She is pleased at the warm reception Brown receives from business merchants but quickly becomes concerned about some of his heavy-handed methods of dealing with drunks. When questioned about his tactics, Brown replies, “This ain’t administration, Sarge, it’s the streets, and our job is to sweep ‘em clean.” Jackson speaks with Brown’s former supervisor, who said he had received several verbal complaints against Brown from citizens, but none could be substantiated. Apparently no one was interested in the word of a drunk against a popular officer. Two days later, Sgt. Jackson is called to the county jail to meet with a booking officer, Hamstead, who wants to talk with her about a drunk who was booked a few hours earlier by Brown. Another prisoner has confided to Hamstead that the drunk was complaining that Brown had injured him by kicking him off a park bench and pushing him down a hill to the transport wagon. The drunk, complaining of pain in his side, was then taken to the hospital and treated for three broken ribs. When asked later about the incident, the drunk refused to cooperate and simply told Hamstead, “I fell down.”

    Questions for Discussion

    1.

    How should Sgt. Jackson handle this matter?

    2.

    What are her options? Her responsibilities?

    3.

    What types of disciplinary policy changes should the department consider to prevent these situations from occurring?

    (Peak 266-267)

    Peak, Kenneth J., Larry K. Gaines and Ronald Glensor. Police Supervision and Management for Ashford University, 3rd Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions. VitalBook file.

    The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

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