Provide a rationale for how gaining proficiency of these competencies would better enable you to personally contribute to your organization’s culture of excellence.

A 3-4 page paper addressing the following:

1. Assess your proficiency for two SHRM competencies you selected

1. Communication

2. Ethical Practice

Include one competency you consider to be a personal strength and one you could improve upon.

2. Analyze each competency you selected.

a. include how they relate to health care organizations striving for a culture of excellence.

b. Provide a rationale for how gaining proficiency of these competencies would better enable you to personally contribute to your organization’s culture of excellence.

APA format.  In-text citations.  at least 4 References

Reference

Society for Human Resource Management. (2012). SHRM competency model.

Retrieved fron https://www.shrm.org/LearningandCareer/competency-model/Publishingimages/pages/defaults/SHRM%20Competency%20model_

Detailed520Report_Final_SECURED.pdf

The SHRM Competency Model®

©2016 Society for Human Resource Management. SHRM grants all users permission to download and use the SHRM Competency Model. However, such permission is limited to individual use and prohibits further distribution without SHRM’s explicit permission. To request permission to distribute the SHRM Competency Model, please contact SHRM at competencies@shrm.org or 800.283.7476 ext. 3366.

mailto:competencies@shrm.org

This report is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information regarding the subject matter covered. It is available free of charge with the understanding that the publisher, Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM®), is not engaged in rendering legal or other professional service. Further, the interpretations, conclusions and recommendations in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the publisher.

The documents and related graphics contained herein could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically added to the information herein. SHRM may make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) described herein at any time.

Copyright© 2016, 2012 by Society for Human Resource Management. All rights reserved.

This publication may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in whole or in part, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the Society for Human Resource Management, 1800 Duke Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314.

SHRM is the world’s largest HR professional society, representing 285,000 members in more than 165 countries. For nearly seven decades, the Society has been the leading provider of resources serving the needs of HR professionals and advancing the practice of human resource management. SHRM has more than 575 affiliated chapters within the United States and subsidiary offices in China, India and United Arab Emirates. Visit us at shrm.org.

To learn more about the SHRM Competency Model, visit shrm.org/learningandcareer/competency-model.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Table of Contents Introduction Page 4

Model Application Page 5

Model Use Page 7

Competency Assessment and Professional Development Page 8

Model Development Page 9

SHRM Competency Model Overview Page 10

Model Key Page 11

HR Professional Career Levels Page 12

HR Professional Competency Clusters Page 14

Competency Cluster: Technical Page 15

Human Resource Expertise (HR Knowledge) Page 16

Competency Cluster: Leadership Page 20

Ethical Practice Page 21

Leadership and Navigation Page 26

Competency Cluster: Business Page 30

Business Acumen Page 31

Consultation Page 36

Critical Evaluation Page 40

Competency Cluster: Interpersonal Page 44

Communication Page 45

Global and Cultural Effectiveness Page 49

Relationship Management Page 53

Additional SHRM Research and Resources Page 57

References Page 58

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Introduction

4

The SHRM Competency Model®, presented in this document, is designed for all HR professionals. We have conducted

several rounds of model development to provide specific behaviors that define proficiency at each stage of an HR

professional’s career. It is designed to serve as a resource for all HR professionals – from those just entering their HR

career to those at the executive level. Further, it can help the HR practitioner create a road map for developing

proficiency in each critical competency to achieve his or her professional goals in HR.1

A competency refers to a cluster of knowledge, skills, abilities and other characteristics (KSAOs) needed for effective

job performance. Competencies simplify the process of tying concrete examples of performance expectations to

organizational or professional missions and goals, which increases the likelihood of a positive impact on organizational

outcomes (Campion et al., 2011; Shippmann et al., 2000). A set of competencies that define the requirements for

effective performance in a specific job, profession or organization are collectively referred to as a competency model.

Competencies can be either technical or behavioral. Technical competencies primarily reflect the knowledge-based

requirements of a specific job category (e.g., HR professionals). Behavioral competencies are typically more general

and at surface level can apply across multiple job categories, describe the specific and observable behavior associated

with effective job performance and reflect the ways in which knowledge is applied. Typically, competency models also

include detailed information for each competency, such as key behaviors and standards of proficiency that apply to

different levels of job experience or expertise.

Competency models play an important role in the selection, training and appraisal of HR and other professionals. HR

professionals can use competency models for individual career management and development purposes by guiding the

choice of job assignments and in making other career decisions. Businesses and other organizations can use

competency models to help structure their organization and teams to align what is needed for successful performance

to organizational strategy. An organization can also use well designed competency models to build performance

assessments for existing employees, create behavioral interviews for hiring new employees and determine selection

criteria for succession planning.

1 The SHRM Competency Model is intended to be used for developmental purposes only. Selection decisions should not be based

upon this model.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Model Application

5

As part of our efforts to serve our members and the profession, SHRM continually aims to identify what makes an HR

professional successful and how SHRM can better support HR professionals in achieving their professional goals.

Thus, SHRM developed the SHRM Competency Model to identify and define the foundational competencies required

for HR professionals:

• at the entry, mid, senior and executive levels of the HR profession

• in small, medium and large enterprises

• in private, public, nonprofit and not-for-profit sectors

• in organizations with multinational and domestic operations.

This model and the resources developed based on the model are designed to help HR professionals succeed in their

current roles and develop a roadmap for career advancement. Through professional development and continuous

learning, any HR professional can develop proficiency in competencies that will bolster success in his or her career. In

addition, proficiency in the competencies defined in the SHRM Competency Model helps the HR professional contribute

to her or his organization’s success in a meaningful way.

SHRM developed the model to provide a clear understanding of what makes an HR professional successful or where

he or she needs to develop further. Thus, it helps the HR profession by serving as a benchmark for HR success as well

as a framework for communicating to others what we do as a profession. For example, the SHRM BoCKTM, which

serves as the foundation for the SHRM Certification Exams and SHRM educational resources available to prepare for

the exams, is based on the SHRM Competency Model. The SHRM Competency Model also serves as a guideline for

many of the articles published in HR Magazine and as an outline for sessions at our Annual Conference and other

SHRM conferences.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Model Application (Continued)

6

SHRM has conducted extensive research in developing a robust competency model that applies to the HR profession

as a whole. The model is designed to reflect competencies that will be important in the career of an HR professional

regardless of industry, sector or geographic region.

Although individual differences in the importance of the competencies may arise for HR professionals in their specific

day-to-day functions, these differences tend to play out more at the level of individual behaviors or knowledge required,

not at the overall competency level. In other words, regardless of industry, sector, geography or other factors beyond

career level, the same nine competencies included in the SHRM Competency Model reflect the most critical

competencies for distinguishing between high- and low-performing HR professionals.

SHRM’s Competency Model distinguishes between four different career levels: early, mid, senior and executive. As HR

titles and organizational needs vary (across organizations, across cultures, etc.), SHRM has operationalized the various

career levels accordingly.

The SHRM Competency Model identifies specific behaviors that define proficiency at each stage of an HR

professional’s career. It serves as a resource to understand how you should be performing in your current career level

as well as what you will need to know and do to succeed at the next level. We define the HR professional Career levels

represented in the SHRM Competency Model on the following pages.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Model Use

7

There are a number of ways that you can use the SHRM Competency Model in your day-to-day functions as an HR

professional. For example, HR professionals can use the model for their own professional development to identify

strengths as well as areas needed for growth, progression toward proficiency in each competency, and readiness for

the next stage of their HR career.

Further, HR professionals can use the model and its components in the planning and design of their HR departments.

The model is built to easily align with existing organizational strategies and can be used to identify areas of strategic

importance in the HR function. HR departments can also use the model to identify HR competency strengths and gaps

from which staffing, performance management, and training and development plans and processes can be established.

The model can be used to design professional development activities for HR teams as well.

HR leaders can use the SHRM Competency Model to clarify and communicate to others in their organization what HR

does and how it aligns with the culture and other business processes in the organization. By showing other leaders

what HR does and how it aligns with the rest of the business, HR can create more collaborative working relationships

and build greater buy-in and trust, key factors leading to successful strategic HR management. By using the SHRM

Diagnostic™ – HR Department Tool, HR leaders can gain feedback from others in the organization about how well their

HR department is doing across each of the competencies. This information can be invaluable to improving HR

department effectiveness and showing the importance to other organizational leaders that HR sees performance

accountability as critical to business success.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Competency Assessment and Professional Development

8

One of the primary benefits of the SHRM Competency Model is that HR professionals can use it to guide their career

development. SHRM developed the model to apply across the entire HR career lifecycle and is continually producing

new activities, tools, and other content to help individuals in their current career level as well as to prepare for the next

career level.

There are several ways you can assess your proficiency in these competencies. First and foremost, if you are not

already certified, or if your certification has lapsed, you can sign up to become certified.

In preparation for certification, you can purchase access to the SHRM e-Learning System where you will have the

opportunity to take a practice assessment (in addition to learning more about what knowledge and behaviors are critical

to successful HR performance).

In addition, SHRM offers a suite of Competency Diagnostic Tools that can be used by individuals and organizations to

assess their proficiency level at various career stages for each competency. These assessments include:

• Self-Tool – assess how proficient you see yourself in each competency

• 180 Tool – capture your own perceived proficiency in each competency as well as your supervisor’s perception of

your proficiency

• 360 Tool – allow your direct reports or others, along with you and your supervisor, to assess your proficiency in

each competency

Through each of these tools, you can get a robust sense of your proficiency in the competencies necessary for success

as an HR professional.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Model Development

9

SHRM followed best practices delineated by the Society for Industrial Organizational Psychology (SIOP) taskforce on

competency modeling (Campion et al., 2011; Shippmann et al., 2000). Accordingly, SHRM developed the SHRM

Competency Model in three phases: initial model development, content validation and criterion validation.

In the initial model development phase, SHRM developed a draft of the model based on:

• A thorough review and synthesis of the relevant literature and

• Input from over 1,200 HR professionals during 111 focus groups in 29 cities throughout the world.

Content validation refers to gathering evidence supporting the assumption that what is included in the competency

model actually reflects what is necessary for successful performance. SHRM gathered content validation evidence for

the SHRM Competency Model through a survey with over 32,000 subject matter experts who provided ratings regarding

the accuracy, relevance, and importance of the competency model’s content. Based on the results of this survey, SHRM

refined the draft model. Together, with the focus group data collected in the initial model development phase, the

perspectives of HR professionals from 33 different nations were represented in the development of the SHRM

Competency Model. See the Content Validation Study Report for more information.

Criterion validation refers to gathering evidence supporting the assumption that differences in proficiency in the

competencies included in the model predict differences in work performance. SHRM gathered criterion validation

evidence for the SHRM Competency Model by collecting data on competency proficiency (i.e., self-ratings and

situational judgment responses) and supervisor ratings of employee performance. SHRM then analyzed these data to

identify the statistical relationship between competency proficiency and performance. See the Criterion Validation Study

Report for more information.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

SHRM Competency Model Overview

SHRM’s Competency Model for HR professionals

consists of nine competencies:

10

• Human Resource Expertise (HR Knowledge)

• Ethical Practice

• Leadership and Navigation

• Business Acumen

• Consultation

• Critical Evaluation

• Communication

• Global and Cultural Effectiveness

• Relationship Management

Developing a robust, tiered competency model for

the HR profession has allowed SHRM to identify

how best to serve members at each stage of their

careers. Where possible, SHRM aligns its products,

conference sessions, publications and other

resources to the SHRM Competency Model. In this

report, we describe the SHRM Competency Model

and its competencies in detail.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Model Key

11

Each competency consists of six distinct elements: title, definition, cluster, subcompetencies, key behaviors and

proficiency standards. These elements are discussed in the key below.

Key

Title Title of the competency

Definition Overall definition of the competency

Cluster Competency cluster under which the competency is

categorized (described in the following section)

Subcompetencies Small clusters of KSAOs embedded within a broader

competency

They are not distinct from the broader general competency.

Rather, they are more specific manifestations of the general

competency for which they are a part of. In aggregate, the

subcompetencies form each competency.

Key Behaviors Behaviors associated with each competency that the most

competent professionals engage in while performing their

jobs

Proficiency

Standards

Specific, job-relevant behaviors associated with performance

on each competency at each of the four career levels

(described in the following section)

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

HR Professional Career Levels

12

Early Level

•An “Early Level” HR professional is characterized in the following way:

•Little to no experience •Supports operational functions •May manage small-sized projects •Carries out the HR plan at the transactional level

•For example: Jamie is relatively new to the HR profession and has just over one year of experience as an HR professional. Although Jamie is a specialist who supports a specific function in the HR department, Jamie has generalist colleagues with similar levels of experience and responsibility who support specific functions in the HR department. Jamie has responsibilities such as, but not limited to, supporting HR initiatives, executing tasks passed down from management, and operating at the tactical and transactional levels. Jamie and colleagues at Jamie’s level hold titles such as, but not limited to, HR assistant, junior recruiter and benefits clerk.

Mid Level

•A “Mid Level” HR professional is characterized in the following way:

•Moderate experience •Leads or supports operational functions •Leads or manages small- to mid-sized projects •Implements the HR plan and contributes to its refinement

•For example: Tyler has around five years of experience as an HR professional. Although Tyler is an HR generalist, Tyler has colleagues with similar levels of experience and responsibility who are senior HR specialists. Tyler has responsibilities such as, but not limited to, managing projects, programs and initiatives, implementing plans passed down and delegating tasks to early-level staff. Tyler and colleagues at Tyler’s level hold titles such as, but not limited to, HR manager, HR generalist and HR specialist.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

HR Professional Career Levels

13

Senior Level

•A “Senior Level” HR professional is characterized in the following way:

•Significant experience

•Serves as a high-level strategic and/or operational leader or as an experienced HR consultant

•Oversees large or multiple programs or projects

•Operationalizes HR strategy and translates strategy into a plan

•For example: Adison is a seasoned HR professional with around 10 years of experience. Although Adison is a very experienced specialist, Adison has colleagues with similar levels of experience and responsibility who are very experienced generalists. Adison has responsibilities such as, but not limited to, developing and leading implementation plans and analyzing business information. Adison and colleagues at Adison’s level hold titles such as, but not limited to, director or principal.

Executive Level

•An “Executive Level” HR professional is characterized in the following way:

•Typically is one of the most senior leaders in HR

•Holds the top HR job in the organization or VP role

•For example: Helen is the organization’s most senior HR professional with 15 years of experience. As a member of the organization’s executive committee, Helen serves as an organizational leader and designer of human capital strategy. Helen knows of individuals with similar responsibilities at other organizations who have more years of experience as an HR professional. Helen and individuals at a similar level hold titles such as, but not limited to, chief human resource officer or vice president.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

HR Professional Competency Clusters

14

HR professionals are business leaders who, whether formally or informally, must frequently take on leadership roles

regardless of their level within the organization. SHRM research indicates that effectiveness as an HR leader is a

function of technical (T) knowledge of HR plus three behavioral clusters – leadership (L), business (B) and interpersonal

(I). SHRM refers to this model as the LBIT Model.

The initial component of the model is HR technical expertise. Together, the technical areas represent the collective HR

Expertise (HR Knowledge) needed to succeed as an HR professional. Examples of these technical areas include

employee and labor relations, compensation and benefits, talent acquisition, and learning and development.

The second cluster of competencies is interpersonal proficiency. A key factor for achieving success is the proficiency

demonstrated in managing relationships, communicating information, and demonstrating deft global and cultural

sensitivities. In addition, a significant part of an HR professional’s job is characterized by interdependence with

stakeholders. Accordingly, this cluster consists of the Communication, Relationship Management and Global and

Cultural Effectiveness competencies.

The third cluster of competencies is business-oriented proficiency. A key factor for achieving success is proficiency in

analyzing and interpreting data, offering coaching and consultative services, and making savvy business decisions for

the organization. Further, today’s HR professionals are considered business partners across the organization. Thus,

they must be able to (a) understand and apply information to contribute to the organization’s strategic plan, (b) interpret

information to make business decisions and recommendations, and (c) provide guidance to organizational stakeholders.

In other words, these successful practitioners are proficient in the competencies that make up this cluster: Business

Acumen, Critical Evaluation and Consultation.

The final cluster of competencies is leadership proficiency. A key factor for achieving success is the proficiency

demonstrated in navigating the landscape of industry, engendering cooperation, driving results with strategic planning

and execution, and practicing ethically for corporate social responsibility. This cluster consists of the Leadership and

Navigation and Ethical Practice competencies.

Competency Cluster: Technical

HR EXPERTISE (HR KNOWLEDGE)

Human Resource Expertise (HR Knowledge)

HR EXPERTISE (HR KNOWLEDGE) © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Human Resource Expertise (HR Knowledge)

17

Subcompetencies:

o Strategic Business Management

o Workforce Planning and Employment

o Human Resource Development

o Compensation and Benefits

o Risk Management

o Employee and Labor Relations

o HR Technology

o Global and International Human Resource

Capabilities

o Talent Management

o Change Management

Definition: The knowledge of principles, practices and functions of effective human resource management

Cluster: Technical

Behaviors:

o Remains current on relevant laws, legal rulings and regulations

o Maintains up-to-date knowledge of general HR practices, strategy and technology

o Demonstrates a working knowledge of critical human resource functions (see Subcompetencies)

o Prioritizes work duties for maximum efficiency

o Develops and utilizes best practices

o Delivers customized human resource solutions for organizational challenges

o Seeks professional HR development

o Seeks process improvement through numerous resources

o Utilizes core business and HR-specific technologies to solve business challenges

HR EXPERTISE (HR KNOWLEDGE) © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Human Resource Expertise (HR Knowledge)

18

Proficiency Standards by Career Level

Early Level

•Identifies ways to improve operational efficiency

•Routes stakeholder questions to the appropriate area

•Uses judgment to determine when to consult with higher-level management on problems or other issues

•Provides service to stakeholders

•Generates and, when appropriate, implements solutions within designated area of responsibility

•Employs standard operating procedures and policies when performing HR transactions

•Reports workplace risk management issues to leadership (e.g., safety, health)

•Develops knowledge of general HR practices and technology

•Executes transactions with minimal errors

•Follows relevant laws and regulations

•Works under the general direction of a more experienced HR professional

•Uses relevant HR technology systems for administrative and service needs

•Demonstrates a willingness to learn

Mid Level

•Serves as the HR subject matter expert to managers

•Conducts investigations of workplace policy violations

•Manages day-to-day HR functions

•Implements change based on proven change- management techniques

•Applies policies and procedures across organization

•Interprets both policies and changes to policy

•Applies compliance knowledge to protect organization

•Oversees risk management issues (e.g., safety, health, legal issues)

•Implements solutions within designated area of responsibility

•Seeks ways to proactively improve organizational processes and outcomes

•Implements HR technology plans

•Applies experience and expertise to research solutions

•Reports trends to senior leadership

•Recommends policy changes to support business needs

HR EXPERTISE (HR KNOWLEDGE) © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Human Resource Expertise (HR Knowledge)

19

Senior Level

•Provides expertise to support staff development

•Implements HR operational strategy

•Partners with executive-level staff throughout the organization to get input on HR decisions

•Ensures the delivery of high-quality HR processes

•Evaluates potential issues or service needs and operationalizes strategic response

•Determines best practices to support organizational direction

•Designs strategy for organizational culture

•Mentors HR professionals and others within the organization

•Recommends methods for integration of HR services with organizational initiatives

•Recommends HR technology decisions

•Develops policies and procedures consistent with organizational values and goals

•Analyzes functional programs

•Assesses compliance risks

Executive Level

•Establishes criteria for compliance responsibilities

•Assumes responsibility for HR and business outcomes

•Assesses strategic organizational HR needs

•Educates and advises executive team on strategic HR issues as a factor in decision-making

•Applies broad-based HR knowledge to business needs in a proactive manner

•Ensures alignment of HR policies and procedures with organizational values and goals

•Influences direction and creates a vision for the HR team

•Aligns the delivery of HR services to proactively integrate with organizational initiatives

•Assesses business situations and develops strategies to improve organizational performance

•Provides balanced long-term and short-term strategic vision

•Evaluates potential issues or service needs and proactively develops strategic response

•Designs proactive strategic initiatives

•Oversees HR issues involving legal and financial risk to organization

•Provides vision for achieving mission objectives through human capital strategy

•Evaluates strategic position in relation to internal and external forces

•Sets HR technology strategy

Competency Cluster: Leadership

ETHICAL PRACTICE

Ethical Practice

ETHICAL PRACTICE © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Ethical Practice

22

Definition: The ability to integrate core values, integrity and accountability throughout all organizational and business

practices

Cluster: Leadership

Behaviors:

o Maintains confidentiality

o Acts with personal, professional and behavioral integrity

o Responds immediately to all reports of unethical behavior or conflicts of interest

o Empowers all employees to report unethical behavior or conflicts of interest without fear of reprisal

o Shows consistency between espoused and enacted values

o Acknowledges mistakes

o Drives the corporate ethical environment

o Applies power or authority appropriately

o Recognizes personal bias and others’ tendency toward bias, and takes measures to mitigate the influence of

bias in business decisions

o Maintains appropriate levels of transparency in organizational practices

o Ensures that all stakeholder voices are heard

o Manages political and social pressures when making decisions

Subcompetencies:

o Rapport Building

o Trust Building

o Personal, Professional and Behavioral Integrity

o Professionalism

o Credibility

o Personal and Professional Courage

ETHICAL PRACTICE © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Ethical Practice

23

Proficiency Standards by Career Level

Early Level

•Supports training programs regarding ethical laws, standards and policies

•Demonstrates accountability for actions

•Behaves in a manner consistent with the difficult decisions made by management

•Identifies potential conflicts of interest

•Follows policies consistently

•Documents and escalates reports of unethical behavior to management

•Maintains employee confidentiality throughout appropriate business processes

•Maintains knowledge of internal organizational controls

•Maintains awareness of ethics laws, standards, legislation and trends that may affect organizational HR practice

•Supports HR policies, procedures and guidelines

•Establishes one’s self as a credible and trustworthy source for employees to voice concerns

Mid Level

•Maintains general knowledge of ethical laws, standards, legislation and trends that may affect organizational HR practice

•Reinforces difficult decisions that align with organizational strategies and values

•Establishes one’s self as a credible resource for all issues involving employees and management

•Develops and supports systems for reporting unethical behavior

•Enforces policies consistently

•Establishes one’s self as a credible and trustworthy source for employees to voice concerns

•Influences others to behave in an ethical manner

•Performs as an ethical role model and positively influences managerial integrity and accountability

•Implements training programs regarding ethics laws, standards and policies

•Takes immediate and appropriate action regarding reports of unethical behavior or conflicts of interest

•Audits and monitors adherence to policies and procedures

•Creates processes to ensure confidentiality and privacy of employee information and company data

ETHICAL PRACTICE © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Ethical Practice

24

Senior Level

•Establishes oneself as a credible and trustworthy source for employees to voice concerns

•Maintains contemporary knowledge of ethics laws, standards, legislation and emerging trends that may affect organizational behaviors and practice

•Establishes HR team as a credible and trustworthy resource within the organization

•Supports executives’ decisions and makes own difficult decisions that align with organizational strategies and values

•Oversees processes to protect the confidentiality of employee information

•Responds promptly and appropriately to reports of unethical behavior

•Evaluates potential ethical risks and liabilities to the organization

•Serves as a role model of ethical behavior by consistently conforming to the highest ethical standards and practices

•Develops systems for employees to report unethical behavior

•Sets organizational standards for confidentiality of employee data and privacy of company data

•Withstands political pressures when implementing and enforcing policies and procedures

•Briefs executives on any reports of unethical behavior or conflicts of interest that might threaten the organization

•Ensures access to ethical standards and policies for all employees across business units

•Develops ethical policies and procedures for implementation

•Champions organizational values

•Establishes self as a credible resource for all issues involving employees and their management

ETHICAL PRACTICE © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Ethical Practice

25

Executive Level

•Empowers senior leaders to maintain internal controls and create an ethical environment to prevent conflicts of interest

•Maintains contemporary knowledge of ethics, laws, standards, legislation and emerging trends that may affect organizational HR practice

•Establishes one’s self as a credible and trustworthy source for employees to voice concerns

•Challenges other executives and senior leaders when potential conflicts of interest arise

•Withstands politically motivated pressure when developing strategy

•Sets the standard for being a role model of ethical behavior by consistently conforming to the highest ethical standards and practices

•Balances organizational success and employee advocacy when creating strategy

•Develops HR policies and internal controls to minimize organizational risk from unethical practice

•Creates HR strategy that holds employees accountable for their actions

•Makes difficult decisions that align with organizational strategies and values

•Communicates the vision for an organizational culture where espoused and enacted values align

•Maintains a culture that requires all employees to report unethical practices and behavior

•Aligns all HR practices with ethics, laws and standards

LEADERSHIP & NAVIGATION

Leadership and Navigation

LEADERSHIP & NAVIGATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Leadership and Navigation

27

Definition: The ability to direct and contribute to initiatives and processes within the organization

Cluster: Leadership

Behaviors:

o Exhibits behaviors consistent with and conforming to organizational culture

o Fosters collaboration

o Understands the most effective and efficient way to accomplish tasks within the parameters of organizational

hierarchy, processes, systems and policies

o Develops solutions to overcome potential obstacles to successful implementation of initiatives

o Demonstrates agility and expertise when leading organizational initiatives or when supporting the initiatives

of others

o Sets the vision for HR initiatives and builds buy-in from internal and external stakeholders

o Leads the organization through adversity with resilience and tenacity

o Promotes consensus among organizational stakeholders (e.g., employees, business unit leaders, informal

leaders) when proposing new initiatives

o Serves as a transformational leader for the organization by leading change

Subcompetencies:

o Transformational and Functional Leadership

o Results- and Goal-Oriented

o Resource Management

o Succession Planning

o Project Management

o Mission Driven

o Change Management

o Political Savvy

o Influence

o Consensus Builder

LEADERSHIP & NAVIGATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Leadership and Navigation

28

Proficiency Standards by Career Level

Early Level

•Listens actively to identify potential challenges or solutions

•Builds credibility with stakeholders

•Makes HR transactional decisions within established policies and guidelines

•Assists with the implementation of initiatives and escalates issues

•Demonstrates flexibility, adaptability and initiative

•Acts consistently with and represents the culture of the organization

•Seeks new ways to improve and recommends improvements to HR processes, transactions and outcomes

•Develops knowledge of internal policies and procedures for responding to transactional issues

•Provides detail-oriented support in the administration of organizational programs and initiatives

•Gains the knowledge and skill to implement organizational processes and initiatives

•Serves as a team member for passed down projects

Mid Level

•Manages programs, policies and procedures to support the organizational culture

•Demonstrates flexibility, adaptability and initiative

•Develops skills in managing resources available to meet planned objectives

•Supports critical large-scale organizational changes

•Serves as point person on projects and tasks

•Makes policy interpretations and practice decisions

•Implements plans using results-oriented goals for measuring success

•Serves as the principal liaison to frontline managers for HR strategies, philosophies and initiatives within the organization

•Develops leadership presence with management support at the business unit level

•Develops political savvy when implementing initiatives

•Serves as manager of organizational initiatives within units

•Operationalizes projects and initiatives as set forth by the higher-level plan

LEADERSHIP & NAVIGATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Leadership and Navigation

29

Senior Level

•Establishes programs, policies and procedures to support the organizational culture

•Promotes HR capabilities to the organization

•Leads project plans for timely completion

•Translates the mission, vision and strategy into projects and initiatives with milestones and delivery schedules

•Effectively manages the resources available to meet planned objectives for initiatives

•Makes departmental/functional decisions

•Develops clear action plans with results-oriented goals for measuring success

•Drives alignment and buy-in at all levels in business units across organization

•Serves as a change agent for the organization

Executive Level

•Leads HR staff in maintaining or changing organizational culture

•Works with other executives to design, maintain and champion the mission, vision and strategy of the organization

•Identifies the need for and facilitates strategic organizational change

•Ensures alignment between the human capital mission, vision and organizational business strategy

•Serves as the influential voice for HR strategies, philosophies and initiatives within the organization

•Develops the organizational strategy for achieving the human capital vision and mission

•Manages risk, opportunities and gaps in business strategy

•Oversees critical large-scale organizational changes with the support of business leaders

•Ensures appropriate accountability for the implementation of plans and change initiatives

•Sets tone for maintaining or changing organizational culture

•Champions the HR function and organizational mission and vision

•Gains buy-in for organizational change across senior leadership with agility

Competency Cluster: Business

BUSINESS ACUMEN

Business Acumen

BUSINESS ACUMEN © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Business Acumen

32

Definition: The ability to understand and apply information to contribute to the organization’s strategic plan

Cluster: Business

Behaviors:

o Demonstrates an understanding of the strategic relationship between effective human resource management

and core business functions

o Demonstrates a capacity for understanding the business operations and functions within the organization

o Understands the industry and business/competitive environment within which the organization operates

o Makes the business case for HR management (e.g., return on investment/ROI) as it relates to efficient and

effective organizational functioning

o Understands organizational metrics and their correlation to business success

o Uses organizational resources to learn the business and operational functions

o Uses organizational metrics to make decisions

o Markets HR both internally (e.g., ROI of HR initiatives) and externally (e.g., employment branding)

o Leverages technology to solve business problems

Subcompetencies:

o Strategic Agility

o Business Knowledge

o Systems Thinking

o Economic Awareness

o Effective Administration

o Knowledge of Finance and Accounting

o Knowledge of Sales and Marketing

o Knowledge of Technology

o Knowledge of Labor Markets

o Knowledge of Business Operations/Logistics

o Knowledge of Government and Regulatory

Guidelines

o HR and Organizational

Metrics/Analytics/Business Indicators

BUSINESS ACUMEN © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Business Acumen

33

Proficiency Standards by Career Level

Early Level

•Demonstrates basic knowledge of business lines and products/services

•Gathers, assembles and reports HR metrics, key performance indicators and labor market trends

•Possesses operational/processing expertise for assigned tasks

•Develops basic knowledge of HR Metrics

•Identifies inefficiencies and provides process improvement recommendations

•Develops basic knowledge of competitor organizations

•Develops familiarity with business terms and acronyms

•Develops knowledge and understanding of value of cost-benefit analysis

Mid Level

•Maintains functional knowledge of organizational business units

•Gathers, assembles and reports HR metrics and labor market trends

•Utilizes appropriate business terms and vocabulary in interactions with employees and leaders

•Develops skill in building business cases for HR projects and initiatives

•Maintains knowledge of HR metrics and business metrics, including key performance indicators and relationships with one another

•Develops HR marketing messages to both internal and external audiences

•Maintains working knowledge of business lines as well as competitive market

•Manages project and initiative budgets

•Analyzes data for HR metrics to make recommendations

•Defines critical activities in terms of value added, impact, utility derived from cost-benefit analysis

•Manages process improvement initiatives

•Implements organization-wide business practices/operations

•Develops the ability to apply the principles of finance, marketing, economics, sales, technology and business systems to internal HR processes and policies

•Implements HR and business technology plans to solve business problems and needs

BUSINESS ACUMEN © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Business Acumen

34

Senior Level

•Maintains advanced knowledge of key industry and organization metrics – ‘knows the business’

•Aligns HR strategy, goals and objectives to overall business strategy and objectives

•Develops HR business strategies to drive key business results

•Demonstrates fluency in the language of business administration and senior leaders

•Creates an action plan for managing talent within the confines of the labor market

•Develops strategy for HR marketing messages to both internal and external audiences

•Communicates organizational impact of metrics

•Determines goals, plans and budget requirements

•Develops business strategy with top leaders of the organization

•Uses knowledge of business and HR metrics to make business decisions

•Maintains knowledge of economic factors and economic environment impact on industry and organization operations

•Recommends business practice/plan improvements

•Ensures all HR initiatives have ROI that adds to organizational value

•Builds business cases for HR projects and initiatives

•Develops organization-wide business practices/operations

Senior Level

•Demonstrates a working knowledge of the labor market and its relation to organizational success

•Develops HR and business technology plans to solve business problems and needs

•Benchmarks the competition and other relevant comparison groups

•Uses the language of business administration and senior leaders

•Evaluates critical activities in terms of value added, impact and utility derived from cost-benefit analysis

•Maintains broad-based knowledge of the organization and its operations

•Applies consistently the principles of finance, marketing, economics, sales, technology and business systems to internal HR processes and policies

•Develops business acumen of team

•Sets policies and procedures/practices to support organizational success

•Maintains a systems-thinking perspective when making business decisions

•Maintains advanced knowledge of business lines and products/services, as well as the competitive market

•Implements solutions with analysis of impact on ROI, utility, revenue, profit and loss estimates, and other business indicators

•Evaluates all proposed business cases for HR projects and initiatives

BUSINESS ACUMEN © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Business Acumen

35

Executive Level

•Evaluates all proposed business cases for HR projects and initiatives

•Benchmarks the competition and other relevant comparison groups

•Communicates direction on local and global labor market and its relation to organizational success

•Maintains expert knowledge of business lines and products/services, as well as the competitive market

•Develops HR business strategies to drive key business results

•Maintains expert knowledge of economic factors and economic environment impact on industry and organization operations

•Evaluates critical activities in terms of value added, impact and utility derived from a cost-benefit analysis

•Maintains expert knowledge of key industry and organization metrics – ‘knows the business’

•Sets HR and business technology strategy to solve business problems and needs

•Serves as strategic contributor to organizational decision- making regarding fiscal, product/service lines, operations, human capital and technological areas

•Influences government policy and proposed regulations

Executive Level

•Develops business strategy with top leaders of the organization

•Defines strategy for managing talent within the confines of the labor market

•Ensures all HR initiatives have ROI that adds to organizational value

•Assesses risk (SWOT) of business initiatives as it pertains to human capital, ROI and shareholder accountability

•Aligns HR strategy, goals and objectives to overall business strategy and objectives

•Demonstrates fluency in the language of business administration and senior leaders

•Develops solutions with analysis of impact on ROI, utility, revenue, profit and loss estimates, and other business indicators

•Examines all organizational problems with a sense for integrating HR solutions designed to maximize ROI, profit, revenue and strategic effectiveness

CONSULTATION

Consultation

CONSULTATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Consultation

37

Definition: The ability to provide guidance to organizational stakeholders

Cluster: Business

Behaviors:

o Applies creative problem-solving to address business needs and issues

o Serves as an in-house workforce and people management expert

o Analyzes specific business challenges involving the workforce and offers solutions based upon best

practices or research

o Generates specific organizational interventions (e.g., culture change, change management, restructuring,

training, etc.) to support organizational objectives

o Developing consultative and coaching skills

o Guides employees regarding specific career situations

Subcompetencies:

o Coaching

o Project Management (Vision, Design,

Implementation and Evaluation)

o Analytic Reasoning

o Problem-solving

o Inquisitiveness

o Creativity and Innovation

o Flexibility

o Respected Business Partner

o Career Pathing/Talent Management/People

Management

o Time Management

CONSULTATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Consultation

38

Proficiency Standards by Career Level

Early Level

•Develops a proactive perspective on consulting projects

•Conducts initial investigation for HR-based transactional issues

•Gathers and, when appropriate, analyzes facts and data for business solutions

•Raises issues and/or identifies patterns requiring transactional HR solutions

•Identifies stakeholder needs and refers as appropriate

•Provides a summary of pertinent facts and information to mid-level and senior HR leaders

•Manages work time efficiently

Mid Level

•Conducts initial investigation of HR issues

•Evaluates and measures current processes

•Leads the implementation of business solutions

•Champions implementation of strategic initiatives

•Performs investigations on challenging issues

•Manages projects within allotted time and budget

•Gathers facts, information and data to inform HR policy and develop solutions

•Coaches direct reports and others throughout organization utilizing HR expertise

•Develops HR and business process improvement solutions

•Devises short-term immediate solutions in partnership with stakeholders

•Participates in creation of HR interventions

•Serves as a team leader for organizational initiatives and projects

•Provides guidance to managers regarding HR practices

•Identifies threats to the business and recommends effective solutions

CONSULTATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Consultation

39

Senior Level

•Supports business unit leaders on major HR projects

•Provides guidance to managers and business unit teams

•Oversees HR investigations

•Ensures that HR and business solutions are on time, on budget and of high quality

•Designs creative business solutions utilizing HR expertise/perspective

•Coaches frontline managers and business unit leaders on HR- and business-related issues

•Aligns solutions (and interventions) with business strategy and advocates for solution implementation

•Offers business solutions in a proactive manner

•Designs long-term business solutions in partnership with HR customers

Executive Level

•Creates talent management strategies by utilizing creative business solutions to align with and drive the business strategy

•Listens to business leaders’ challenges

•Develops vision for critical solutions to organizational human capital challenges

•Identifies opportunities to provide HR and business solutions that maximize ROI for the organization

•Uses appropriate analytic tools to provide other leaders input on strategic decisions

•Identifies creative solutions for the organization and its business units

•Supervises HR investigations with legal counsel

•Recognizes excessive HR liabilities and provides proactive strategic guidance for remediation

•Coaches executives on people-management issues

•Designs strategic HR and business solutions

CRITICAL EVALUATION

Critical Evaluation

CRITICAL EVALUATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Critical Evaluation

41

Definition: The ability to interpret information to make business decisions and recommendations

Cluster: Business

Behaviors:

o Makes sound decisions based on evaluation of available information

o Assesses the impact of changes to law on organizational human resource management functions

o Transfers knowledge and best practices from one situation to the next

o Applies critical thinking to information received from organizational stakeholders and evaluates what can be

used for organizational success

o Gathers critical information

o Analyzes data with a keen sense for what is useful

o Delineates a clear set of best practices based on experience, evidence from industry literature, published

peer-reviewed research, publicly available web-based sources of information and other sources

o Analyzes information to identify evidence-based best practices

o Identifies leading indicators of outcomes

o Analyzes large quantities of information from research and practice

Subcompetencies:

o Measurement and Assessment Skills

o Objectivity

o Critical Thinking

o Problem Solving

o Curiosity and Inquisitiveness

o Research Methodology

o Decision-making

o Auditing Skills

o Knowledge Management

CRITICAL EVALUATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Critical Evaluation

42

Proficiency Standards by Career Level

Early Level

•Gathers facts and analyzes data using systematic methods (e.g., surveys, focus groups, etc.)

•Develops knowledge in the use of data, evidence-based research, benchmarks, HR and business metrics to facilitate decision- making

•Reports on data entry and key metrics

•Develops basic working knowledge of statistics, research methods, measurement concepts and metrics

•Identifies sources of data and information and learns where to find the most relevant information for solving problems

•Conducts data entry and tracks statistics and metrics

•Collects and synthesizes data through surveys, focus groups, research and other methods

•Engages in preliminary analysis of collected data and reports findings to senior HR staff

Mid Level

•Maintains working knowledge of measurement concepts, data collection and analysis

•Maintains working knowledge of statistics and metrics

•Asks critical questions to prepare and interpret data studies/metrics

•Conducts assessments to address problems and implements solutions within business units

•Evaluates information gathered through research conducted

•Conducts effective program evaluation

•Maintains knowledge in the use of data, evidence-based research, benchmarks, HR and business metrics to make critical decisions

•Identifies patterns in data and raises relevant issues to higher-level management

•Differentiates best practices that will work for own organization/business unit

•Ensures quality work product

•Executes case and pilot studies to evaluate and to address specific problems and questions

•Analyzes data and reports findings and trends

•Maintains objectivity during critical evaluation processes

•Analyzes data and seeks root causes

•Masters research methods and applies them to work

CRITICAL EVALUATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Critical Evaluation

43

Senior Level

•Creates and/or dissects organizational issues, changes or opportunities

•Maintains advanced knowledge in the use of data, evidence-based research, benchmarks, HR and business metrics to make critical decisions

•Maintains advanced knowledge of statistics and metrics

•Provides training and mentoring to upper- and lower- level employees on critical evaluation

•Develops best practice through rigorous research and application of practice in own organization

•Differentiates between tested and untested solutions

•Possesses advanced knowledge and ability to interpret data and make recommendations

•Leads research and evaluation and provides resources for specific issues studied

•Asks critical questions needed to evaluate data

•Manages effective evaluations of organizational programs and interventions

•Implements case and pilot studies to address specific problems

•Validates processes to ensure that they meet desired and reliable outcomes

•Identifies critical messages from research, pilot study findings or best practices

•Integrates findings to select best course of action

Executive Level

•Maintains expert knowledge in the use of data, evidence- based research, benchmarks, HR and business metrics to make critical decisions

•Maintains expert knowledge and ability to interpret data and make recommendations

•Makes decisions with confidence based on analysis of available information to drive business success

•Sets the direction of HR and the organization through evaluation of risks and economic and environmental factors

•Seeks information in a strategic, systematic manner to use in decision-making

•Analyzes information needed to direct, evaluate and use data and other information to make effective decisions

•Sponsors process improvement initiatives using evidence- based solutions

•Communicates the impact on organizational strategy of relevant and important findings from data analysis

•Applies, translates and interprets findings from evaluations toward building effective and creative policies within organizational context

•Utilizes external/environmental awareness and experience in decision-making

•Challenges assumptions and critically examines all initiatives and programs

•Provides strategic view to direct and prioritize decision- making

Competency Cluster: Interpersonal

COMMUNICATION

Communication

COMMUNICATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Communication

46

Definition: The ability to effectively exchange information with stakeholders

Cluster: Interpersonal

Behaviors:

o Provides clear, concise information to others in

verbal, written, electronic and other

communication formats for public and

organizational consumption

o Listens actively and empathetically to the views

of others

o Delivers critical information to all stakeholders

o Seeks further information to clarify ambiguity

o Provides constructive feedback effectively

o Ensures effective communication throughout the

organization

o Provides thoughtful feedback in appropriate

situations

o Provides proactive communications

o Demonstrates an understanding of the

audience’s perspective

o Treats constructive feedback as a

developmental opportunity

o Welcomes the opportunity to discuss competing

points of view

o Helps others consider new perspectives

o Leads effective and efficient meetings

o Helps managers communicate not just on HR

issues

o Utilizes communication technology and social

media

Subcompetencies:

o Verbal Communication Skills

o Written Communication Skills

o Presentation Skills

o Persuasion

o Diplomacy

o Perceptual Objectivity

o Active Listening

o Effective Timely Feedback

o Facilitation Skills

o Meeting Effectiveness

o Social Technology and Social Media Savvy

o Public Relations

COMMUNICATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Communication

47

Proficiency Standards by Career Level

Early Level

•Demonstrates support for HR organizational initiatives in communication with stakeholders

•Promptly responds to stakeholder concerns via written, verbal or electronic communication

•Produces accurate and error-free communication

•Produces top-quality reports and documents

•Communicates policies, procedures, culture, etc. to new and existing employees

•Resolves employee issues or directs appropriately to other resources

•Uses discretion when communicating sensitive information

•Notifies upper management of appropriate issues or concerns

Mid Level

•Delivers well-organized, impactful presentations

•Facilitates and transfers knowledge

•Translates organizational communication strategies into practice at the operational level

•Effectively facilitates staff professional development programs

•Communicates and implements policies on social media

•Listens actively to understand stakeholder concerns at the operational level

•Delivers constructive feedback

•Informs senior management of operational concerns or issues

•Coaches frontline employees on organizational and interpersonal communications

•Fields issues with senior management guidance

•Crafts clear messages that inform frontline HR staff of relevant organizational information

COMMUNICATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Communication

48

Senior Level

•Communicates strategy and initiatives to business unit leaders and HR staff

•Communicates plans for ensuring the alignment between organizational HR initiatives and organizational strategy

•Fosters the organizational vision for HR practice and policy

•Solicits feedback and buy-in on HR initiatives from organizational stakeholders

•Disseminates HR and other executives’ messages to stakeholders

•Creates channels for open communication across and within levels of responsibility

•Negotiates with vendors and staff to reach best possible outcomes

•Engages in conversations with stakeholders using appropriate communication modes and methods to achieve desired outcomes

•Oversees culture communication strategy

Executive Level

•Articulates the alignment between organizational HR initiatives and organizational strategy

•Communicates the corporate mission and vision to other stakeholders

•Creates strategy for a culture that fosters efficient and effective interactions and decision-making

•Crafts messages to be delivered to stakeholders regarding high-visibility organizational issues

•Negotiates with stakeholders to reach best possible outcomes

•Solicits feedback and buy-in from executive-level stakeholders

•Develops strategy for organizational systems of communication

•Delivers strategic messages supporting HR and business

•Builds support and inspires confidence through clear communications

•Communicates HR vision, practices and policies to other stakeholders

•Comfortably communicates with audiences of all sizes

GLOBAL & CULTURAL EFFECTIVENESS

Global and Cultural Effectiveness

GLOBAL & CULTURAL EFFECTIVENESS © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Global and Cultural Effectiveness

50

Definition: The ability to value and consider the perspectives and backgrounds of all parties

Cluster: Interpersonal

Behaviors:

o Has a strong set of core values while operating

with adaptability to particular conditions, situations

and people

o Maintains openness to others’ ideas and makes

decisions based upon experience, data, facts and

reasoned judgment

o Demonstrates nonjudgmental respect for other

perspectives

o Works effectively with diverse cultures and

populations

o Conducts business with an understanding and

respect for the differences in rules, customs, laws,

regulations and business operations between own

culture and all cultures

o Takes the responsibility to teach others about the

differences and benefits that multiple cultures bring

to the organization to ensure inclusion

o Appreciates the commonalities, values and

individual uniqueness of all human beings

o Possesses self-awareness and humility to learn

from others

o Embraces inclusion

o Adapts perspective and behavior to meet the

cultural context

o Navigates the differences between commonly

accepted practice and law when conducting

business in other nations

o Operates with a global, open mindset while being

sensitive to local cultural issues and needs

o Operates with a fundamental trust in other human

beings

o Incorporates global business and economic trends

into business decisions

Subcompetencies:

o Global Perspective

o Diversity Perspective

o Openness to Various Perspectives

o Empathy

o Openness to Experience

o Tolerance for Ambiguity

o Adaptability

o Cultural Awareness and Respect

GLOBAL & CULTURAL EFFECTIVENESS © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Global and Cultural Effectiveness

51

Proficiency Standards by Career Level

Early Level

•Possesses general knowledge of local cultural issues

•Respects differences and promotes inclusion on a transactional level

•Possesses general knowledge of organization’s policy and philosophy toward diversity and inclusiveness

•Possesses general awareness and understanding of cultural differences

•Assists with implementation of diversity/culture programs in local settings

•Demonstrates willingness to develop and grow understanding of global and cultural effectiveness

•Demonstrates awareness and appreciation for the global multidimensional and diverse perspectives in organization’s line of business

•Develops some general knowledge of local and global economic trends

Mid Level

•Implements and audits organizational/HR practices to ensure global/cultural sensitivity

•Implements global initiatives, programs and policies while appropriately tailoring to local segment needs

•Provides training on culture trends and practices for expatriate workforce

•Maintains advanced knowledge of cultural differences within the region and potential borders

•Designs, recommends and/or implements diversity/culture programs

•Resolves conflicts due to cultural differences

•Maintains local, global and cultural knowledge/experience

•Employs cultural sensitivity in communicating with staff

•Maintains expert knowledge focused on a particular component/segment of the global organization

•Maintains general knowledge of local and global economic trends

GLOBAL & CULTURAL EFFECTIVENESS © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Global and Cultural Effectiveness

52

Senior Level

•Oversees execution of programs, practices, and policies that make the strategic connection between diversity and inclusiveness practices with organizational success

•Develops expert knowledge of global economic trends and best practices

•Maintains expert global and cultural knowledge/experience

•Fosters culture of inclusiveness within the organization

•Champions diversity with external stakeholders (e.g., diverse suppliers)

•Develops policies that are consistent and fair to members of all backgrounds

•Provides mentoring/training on cultural trends and practices to all levels of the organization

•Implements initiatives to ensure global effectiveness in strategic business units

•Aligns and manages local, regional and global advantages

•Develops diversity and cultural enhancement programs

•Implements culture of inclusion through processes and systems

•Implements and audits practices to ensure global/cultural sensitivity

Executive Level

•Sets the strategy to leverage global competencies for competitive HR advantages

•Uses global economic outlook to determine the impact on the organization’s human capital strategy

•Maintains expert global and cultural knowledge/experience

•Maintains expert knowledge of global economic trends

•Understands global labor markets and associated legal environments

•Fosters the organization’s cultural norms

•Proves the ROI of a diverse workforce

•Manages contradictory or paradoxical practices, policies and cultural norms to ensure cross-cultural harmony and organizational success

•Integrates perspectives on cultural differences and their impact on the success of the organization

•Sets the vision that defines the strategic connection between diversity and inclusiveness practices for employees and organizational success

•Builds cross-cultural relationships and partnerships

RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT

Relationship Management

RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Relationship Management

54

Subcompetencies:

o Business Networking

Expertise

o Visibility

o Customer Service (internal

and external)

o People Management

o Advocacy

o Negotiation and Conflict

Management

o Credibility

o Community Relations

o Transparency

o Proactivity

o Responsiveness

o Mentorship

o Influence

o Employee Engagement

o Teamwork

o Mutual Respect

Behaviors:

o Establishes credibility in all interactions

o Treats all stakeholders with respect and dignity

o Builds engaging relationships with all

organizational stakeholders through trust,

teamwork and direct communication

o Demonstrates approachability and openness

o Ensures alignment within HR when delivering

services and information to the organization

o Provides customer service to organizational

stakeholders

o Promotes successful relationships with

stakeholders

o Manages internal and external relationships in

ways that promote the best interests of all

parties

o Champions the view that organizational

effectiveness benefits all stakeholders

o Serves as an advocate when appropriate

o Fosters effective teambuilding among

stakeholders

o Demonstrates ability to effectively build a

network of contacts at all levels within the HR

function and in the community, both internally

and externally

Definition: The ability to manage interactions to provide service and to support the organization

Cluster: Interpersonal

CONSULTATION © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Relationship Management

55

Proficiency Standards by Career Level

Early Level

•Listens effectively to potential issues before reacting with solutions

•Serves as frontline liaison with vendors/suppliers

•Refers potentially difficult interactions to manager

•Seeks opportunities to interact with stakeholders

•Provides outstanding customer service experience to employees and other stakeholders

•Facilitates the resolution of transactional conflicts that arise

•Provides basic information for resolution of conflicts

•Develops a network of contacts both within the organization and with external partners serving the organization

•Networks with HR peers, both internal and external to organization

•Demonstrates effective interpersonal skills

•Develops a strong and positive reputation both internally and externally as a neutral and approachable HR representative

•Prevents transactional conflicts when possible

•Provides first point of contact for employee questions

•Communicates and demonstrates support for HR decisions passed down even if not consistent with own point of view

Mid Level

•Oversees transactional and/or preliminary stage of employee relations issues

•Assists early-level HR professionals in building networks with higher-level leaders in the organization

•Recognizes potential employee relations issues in a proactive manner and either resolves the issue or moves the concern to senior leaders

•Mediates difficult interactions, escalating problems to higher level when warranted

•Develops network of contacts of internal and external stakeholders, including frontline managers, HR peers and job candidates

•Develops a reputation as a neutral and approachable HR professional serving employees and the organization

•Oversees interactions with vendors/suppliers to maintain service quality

•Ensures early-level HR professionals are providing customer- oriented service

•Ensures that HR decisions from senior leaders are understood and communicated by HR representatives

•Fosters positive team environment among staff

•Identifies staff networking opportunities and venues

•Assists senior HR professionals in the facilitation of difficult interactions among stakeholders

•Develops new partnerships with employees and frontline managers

•Facilitates conflict resolution meetings

RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT © 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Relationship Management

56

Senior Level

•Provides opportunities for employees to interact and build relationships

•Provides career mentorship to mid-level career professionals

•Develops and coordinates HR relationship management objectives and resources

•Mediates difficult employee relations and/or other interactions as a neutral party

•Develops policies and practices for resolving conflicts

•Resolves escalated conflicts among stakeholders

•Develops new partnerships and maintains existing partnerships with vendors, employees and supervisors to maximize value to the organization

•Manages challenging issues in union and non-union environments

•Negotiates with internal and external stakeholders, including vendors, staff and leaders

•Builds consensus and settles disputes internal to HR on policy and practice decisions

•Oversees customer service objectives and outcomes

•Designs programs and policies to cultivate a strong customer service culture in the HR function

•Engages mid-level and early-level staff by building relationships

•Facilitates difficult interactions among organizational stakeholders to achieve optimal outcomes

•Develops a network of contacts, including senior leaders, operational teams, staff, peers, suppliers/vendors and community leaders across organizations

Executive Level

•Designs strategies for improving relationship management performance metrics

•Networks with and influences legislative bodies, union heads and external HR leaders

•Develops and champions organizational customer service strategies and models

•Negotiates with internal and external stakeholders to advance the interests of the organization

•Designs strategies to ensure a strong customer service culture in the HR function

•Creates conflict resolution strategies and processes throughout the organization

•Oversees HR decision-making process to ensure consistency with HR and business strategy

•Develops strategic relationships with internal and external stakeholders

•Fosters a culture that supports intra- organizational relationships throughout the organization (e.g., silo busting)

•Designs strategic opportunities and venues for employee networking and relationship building

•Proactively develops relationships with peers, clients, suppliers, board members and senior leaders

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

Additional SHRM Research and Resources

57

SHRM offers many options for developing your proficiency in the competencies defined in the SHRM Competency

Model, including attending seminars and conferences, reading thought leader guidance on competencies, using the

SHRM Learning System, and networking online with other HR professionals.

• Visit shrm.org/events to learn more about SHRM conferences and events.

• Visit shrm.org/learningandcareer/learning for more information about SHRM seminars.

• Visit shrm.org/hr-today/trends-and-forecasting/special-reports-and-expert-views to read what thought leaders are

saying about the how to be successful in HR.

• Visit community.shrm.org/home to network online with other professionals in HR.

SHRM continues to monitor what is happening in the field of HR and what is necessary for HR professionals to be

successful now and in the future. Based on industry best practices, SHRM plans to make updates to the model every

five to seven years, depending on what our research tells us about changes in HR knowledge and behaviors necessary

for career success. When SHRM does make modifications to the model, we will work across our organization to ensure

that such changes are reflected in our content, products and services to the HR community. In addition, we will

communicate in a timely manner to our members and the HR field in general when significant changes might occur.

Whom can I contact for more information?

For more information about the SHRM Competency Model, please contact us at Competencies@shrm.org.

© 2016 SHRM. All rights reserved.

References

58

Alonso, A., Kurtessis, J.N., Schmidt, A.A., Strobel, S., & Dickson, B. (2015). A competency-based approach to

advancing HR. HR People + Strategy, 38(4), 38-44.

Campion, M.A., Fink, A.A., Ruggeberg, B.J., Carr, L., Phillips, G.M., & Odman, R.B. (2011). Doing competencies well:

Best practices in competency modeling. Personnel Psychology, 64, 225-262.

Shippmann, J.S., Ash, R.A., Battista, M., Carr, L., Eyde, L.D., Hesketh, B., Keyhoe, J., Pearlman, K., Prien, E.P., &

Sanchez, J.I. (2000). The practice of competency modeling. Personnel Psychology, 53, 703-740.

©2016 Society for Human Resource Management

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